Policy Position: Restore the Packers and Stockyards Act

Following is OCM’s policy position on restoring the Packers and Stockyards Act to its original intent. 1. Implement federal legislation that amends Packers and Stockyards Act, 1921(P&S Act) to provide that the use of a ranking system for ranking poultry growers for settlement purposes is unfair, unjustly discriminatory, or deceptive and a strict violation of section 202(a) of the P&S Act regardless of whether it harms or is likely to harm competition. 2. Implement federal legislation that is Read More …

OCM Public Comments Strongly Support GIPSA Fair Practices Rule

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE LINCOLN, NE – In submitting public comments on the USDA’s Grain Inspection, Packers & Stockyards Administration (GIPSA) Fair Practices Rule, the Organization for Competitive Markets (OCM) urges every farmer, every rancher and every consumer to take the time to do the same. OCM President Mike Weaver said, “With the June 12th deadline looming, it is imperative that everyone act now. It appears USDA is disregarding all comments from previous public comment periods and now will Read More …

Former GIPSA Head Debunks NCBA’s Lies About Premium Payments

By Dudley Butler, former GIPSA administrator I was an active member of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) for many years. I quit NCBA because its leaders began to lie to its grassroots membership and I could not stomach it any longer. Today’s NCBA leaders continue this untruthful behavior. These leaders are like Judas goats leading their members to the slaughterhouse of vertical integration. The current lies being told by NCBA leaders involve the recent interim final rule Read More …

POLITICO: The Next GIPSA Question

POLITICO Morning Agriculture A daily briefing on agriculture and food policy By JASON HUFFMAN 04/12/17 10:00 AM EDT With help from Jenny Hopkinson and Eric Wolff THE NEXT GIPSA QUESTION: Now that the USDA has agreed to again push back the effective date of its controversial Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration’s interim final rule, the next action to watch is how commenters respond to the question asked on a new proposed rule, Colin Woodall, the National Cattlemen’s Read More …

Beef Magazine: GIPSA rule delayed, additional comment period opened

Beef Magazine By Burt Rutherford USDA’s Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration once again postpones implementation of its controversial rule. In an announcement that drew cheers from some quarters of the beef business and consternation from others, the Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration (GIPSA) is delaying the effective date of its interim Farmer Fair Practices final rule an additional six months to Oct. 19, 2017, to allow additional comments and giving the new Ag Secretary time to consider Read More …

USDA Delays GIPSA Rule Again, Keeping Farmers in Harm’s Way

Today, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration (GIPSA) announced it is delaying the effective date of the Farmer Fair Practices Interim Final Rule an additional 180 days, until Oct. 19, 2017. Further, it will again solicit public comments on the direction that USDA should take with regard to the rule. During a new 60-day comment period, the public will weigh in on whether USDA should (1) let the rule become effective, (2) suspend Read More …

OCM sends letter to President Trump urging support for GIPSA’s Farmer Fair Practices Rules

On Friday, March 9th, OCM sent the following letter to President Trump, urging him to support the new Farmer Fair Practices Rules to strengthen the Packers & Stockyards Act. These much-needed marketplace safeguards would help level the playing field for family farmers, ensuring they have the opportunity to feed us here at home and to compete in the global market. Enclosed with our letter to President Trump are copies of our comments in support of each of the three Read More …

The New York Times: Leashes Come Off Wall Street, Gun Sellers, Polluters and More

The New York Times By ERIC LIPTON and BINYAMIN APPELBAUM WASHINGTON — Giants in telecommunications, like Verizon and AT&T, will not have to take “reasonable measures” to ensure that their customers’ Social Security numbers, web browsing history and other personal information are not stolen or accidentally released. Wall Street banks like Goldman Sachs and JPMorgan Chase will not be punished, at least for now, for not collecting extra money from customers to cover potential losses from certain kinds Read More …